Meet Ruby_

I found an apartment in Berlin, I bought almost all necessary furniture, and the dust is slowly settling down. I didn’t realize how much turbulence this whole operation “Berlin” would cause, but it is finally over. From the decision in June to take the step to move to Berlin and become a developer until now: over 3 months of madness. Every day I was out and about, chasing some kind of burocratic decision or walking through IKEA’s exhibition for the n-th time until it felt like I lived there. And although for the last 6 years I was on almost continuous movement and started many times from scratch, this time was the most intense, but also feels like the most definite. Maybe it does have to do with – in a way – coming back to the place where I had started my journey, and it has a slight feeling of closing a circle in my life. I am, in a way, back and facing things that I maybe was escaping then. Not implying that the escape was not necessary, in fact I think it was. Because now I have the strength to face life in a city, and not only be peaceful on a green island with merely sheep as neighbors, but also in a big city. (Fun fact: I actually moved to a very green, partially forested park inside Berlin where sheep and cows live in big meadows. I did not search for it specifically, but life’s magic never ceases to surprise me).

Someone asked me if I miss Ireland. I said ‘no’. They were surprised about the clear answer, but it is true. When you follow your heart and go along with life wherever it takes you, you don’t really look back. Yes of course, my adventures somehow live within me and they made me what I am today – but when your decisions are aligned with your heart, you always know that your decisions are right, so you don’t regret anything, and also you don’t really miss anything. You know that the best always lies ahead.

But let’s get to the coding. So far I am exactly 3 weeks into the Careerfoundry Web Development course and I finished the second achievement, which is my Interactive Portfolio or, at least, the front-end of it. So far the challenges weren’t really new to me, and I could walk through the HTML, CSS, Bootstrap, JavaScript, jQuery and API lessons swiftly, but I have to say that it was very helpful to deepen my understanding and learn a few new things here and there, so I am very happy with it. I also have a great Mentor, which is important for this course.

Anyhow, this evening I started finally what I was looking forward in this course: Ruby on Rails.

I am almost exited. I noticed that I really want to get into the backend now. It is just what I want to do. And I get to do it. So I should humbly say a “Thanks” to life and wish everyone a good week ahead!

Eliane ♥

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Galway, Git & Guinness

It is done. I quit my job, yesterday was my last day! Here I am, freedom!

Right after work I drove my car, myself and my stuff from Shannon to Galway, where I had booked accommodation on Airbnb for the next week. After that, I have no plans, but I am open to everything! Life, show me your magic! ♥

I arrived in Galway in the evening and it was raining heavily. I decided for a welcome pint in a local Galway pub, which is something I always do when I return to my favourite place in Europe. I went to the Salthouse, famous for crazy beer, and when I sat outside I started chatting with two young Irish guys who were both in tech (one stuying IT/Networking, the other one working as a software programmer). It was great to talk tech with them and I picked up a few new terms I had’t heard before. Then I checked into my Airbnb in Roscom near the sea.

The place is affordable, cosy and the host is very friendly. He even made me breakfast! And not only that – he also turns out to be a recent “Software Development” graduate from GMIT (one of Galway’s Universities). Now I see why it is a brilliant idea for me to hang around this city – because there are so many tech students around I will be able to learn from.

This morning during breakfast, I started chatting with Sean about programming languages. He repeated what the guy from the pub had told me yesterday – about this fancy thing (err… fullstack javascript framework) called “mean”: http://mean.io/

We then came to talk about Git and he confirmed to me how important it is to know how it works.  The conversation turned into a mini tutorial and he helped me to install Git on my computer, showed me how to push the files into the .git folder, how to upload them to Github after and also how to add the changes to the Repository. Yay Sean!

Git

Here is the freshly uploaded Repository of my website on Github: https://github.com/BohemianCodes/BohemianCodes.com

Eliane ♥

Starting the Freelancer path!

So, today, shit just got real.

Today I signed up for a 399$ course which will teach me over the next 3 months how to become a professional WordPress Developer and work as a freelancer. Class starts on Monday, June 5th!

This is my first real investment into my new career.

I also fast-forwarded my leap into freedom today: I handed in my notice to the call center job in Shannon – where I have been working for the last 8 months (with a 6 week break in India). I will leave on Friday June 9th.

That’s, like, in a week.

And no, I actually don’t have huge savings. And what I have, I just invested in this course – and in a new laptop.

Well… shit just got real.

I’m very happy! 🙂

#freedom ♥

 

 

P.s. how do you like my little logo idea in the header?

 

Udemy’s Complete Web Developer Course 2.0

Coming home today from my full time call center job, (and after a shocking look at my bank account, jeez, when am I actually going to have any of the money I earn?) I took a couple of hours for my studies.

Quick conclusion of the day: Now that I am quite comfortable with HTML & CSS, and I want to move on, things get very complex.

I am currently enrolled in a number of courses at the same time, and the possibilities to learn just from these tutorials are truly immense – but it can be quite overwhelming. I feel I am starting to lose track. I thought I’d first get started with Responsive Design, which basically means to begin to use and understand Bootstrap. Bootstrap however entails certain knowledge of JavaScript. JavaScript entails jQuery and all these other tech terms I am still very much unfamiliar with. Everything seems to explode into this huge cloud of information.

I realize I need some real structure. Rather than jumping from one course to another, I want to follow one hands-on course that helps me to become familiar with the most important languages and concepts. So I started to google again to look up some of the best (& affordable) web development courses available online – and I found Udemy’s “The Complete Web Developer Course 2.0” by Rob Percival. It even includes one year of unlimited webhosting on ecowebhosting.co.uk (which means I will be able to upload my own wordpress site soon – this one is already bugging me) – both for just 10€! Now I don’t know how these things are even possible – but I won’t complain. And, after all the American teachers, I am happy to listen to some British accent for a change 😉

Recap: I need to give my path substance, and structure. How about this little to-do-list:

  1. Complete freeCodeCamp‘s Front-End Developer Coding Challenge
  2. Complete the “Web Developer Course 2.0” on Udemy.com
    (those two alone should keep me busy for several months)
  3. Begin building my Portfolio

I have to keep this plan open and flexible, though. I may feel the need for more direct mentoring and personal guidance one day, so I might want to go for a course like Skillcrush.com later on, but for the moment my bank account does not allow any of this luxury.

By the way, my general goal is simple: to become a freelancer!

Wish me luck!

freeCodeCamp & my first webdev book_

This morning I was randomly browsing some coding girl’s instagram and found a photo of her “free code camp” certificate. I looked it up: It is entirely free & online, serves a good cause and you can start the coding challenges immediately. Against all my expectations, the freeCodeCamp’s resources are so in-depth, that earning the front-end developer certificate means you will have completed 400 hours of coding challenges, back-end another 400, visual designer another 400 hours and finally you build 4 full stack websites for non-profits to a sum of 800 hours.

Challenge accepted!!

I can recommend having a look at it: https://www.freecodecamp.com/

Also, today I received this beautiful one:

cropped-img_26511.jpg

Can’t wait to jump into it! 🙂

The first 3 weeks_

3 weeks ago, on April 16th, 2017 I signed up for lynda.com on a 30-day free trial, knowing there are many online courses of all kinds. I signed up for “HTML Essential Training” and “Web Developer: Full Stack vs. Front End”. I did not even realize it fully back then:  it was the birth of my new career!

I just had been back from six beautiful weeks in India, and returned with no money to my underpaid, yet very demanding full time customer service job in West Ireland. I had been toying with the idea of changing the track of my career for around 6 months, but until then I had considered subjects like “Geomancy” or creative writing. I had skipped the web designer pages in my distance learning catalogue but still considered well paid business studies like project or content management.

Then, after India, the obvious just was suddenly there. And after some research, i knew what I feared before: I am not too old or have too little experience for a job in tech. Actually, the demand for developers is higher than ever. And I am smart. It was sealed.

In only 3 weeks, my knowledge and understanding of the industry exploded. I finished courses on HTML and CSS, as well as wordpress on lynda.com, signed up for free courses on Udacity (who have a great way of explaining the box model), then Codecademy, then Coursera.

After only a few days, I started to design my own website from scratch without a mockup from a tutorial and decided to continue learning without frameworks first. I could not believe how easy it was to create sidebar navigation with simple css and make it look professional and clean. I also tried different text editors like brackets, atom, and sublime text 3.

After I was happy with the design, I uploaded my little website to a subdomain of my father’s shared server which he uses for his clients.

At the same time I started another project called “Iarthar” on a desktop server with wordpress.org (that site is still in dev) – that is also why I decided for a simple wordpress.com site for this purpose here.

My excitement grew and for a while I stuck to my lynda.com tutorials, updated my website and researched online bootcamps (after I found out about their existence, of course).

I was curious about skillcrush.com for its female orientation, it’s afforadble prices and interesting career focus. I signed up for a free 10 day introduction, but at that stage I was looking to find one bootcamp / online course that gave me some structure and a timeframe as to when I could start working as a web developer.

I discovered edX and enrolled in a couple of free courses by Microsoft. I was amazed how much free online resources are available for this subject and I was by now more than sure I could become professional right from my bed in the middle of nowhere in West Ireland. If I found a job here was another question, but hey,  step by step!

On weekend of week 3 I offered my first portfolio project to a friend from New York who runs a Nonprofit in Romania with the local Romani people (his current website: http://tzigania.com) a wonderful project, which imho does need some professional help to become more accessible.


In week 4 I still have no money.

Actually, I don’t even have a desk. I work on the floor, or in my bed. My laptop is an outdated Acer Extensa whose speed is that of an old dachshund, and it’s tab key is broken. I use mobile internet from Three.ie on my iPhone 4s that I connect to my laptop.

But I will make it!